DIY Pink Lemonade Lip Balm

A friend was looking for lip balms to hand out as party favors for her daughter’s 7th birthday and I offered to make some. These were fairly easy but a little more time consuming than ones I have made in the past due to having to make the tint from scratch. She requested something fruity and lemon being the only fruity oil on hand, lemonade was the way to go.

I wanted to keep these as natural as possible since some people have reactions to synthetic red dye so I tried my hand at making beet powder to add as colorant. Recently I purchased beets from our local farmer’s market so this was the perfect time to use one. Usually I like to add it to my morning juices and D. likes his roasted and in salads.

To make beetroot powder
Ingredient 1 small beet.

Pre-heat the oven to 300 degrees F.
Wash and peel the beet.
Use a peeler to make thin slices. No need to make these slices perfect as they will be ground up later.
Place slices on a rack on a tray and put in the oven. Drying time depends on how thinly the beet is sliced up. I was periodically checking it every 10 minutes or so which probably made the cook time longer but I had the time.
Once the pieces looked like dried flower petals I took them out of the oven. Many of them had fallen off the rack on to the pan.
Next put the dehydrated beet pieces into a dry, clean food processor or blender. I used my Ninja on Ultra Blend twice.

Optional: sift and blend larger crumbs again.

To make lip balm
Ingredients
Equal parts
100% Beeswax (locally sourced if possible)
Coconut oil – organic, virgin, cold pressed, unrefined
Shea Butter – organic, cold pressed, unrefined

Some beet root powder
Lemon essential oil

Instructions
Take a small pan and fill 1/3 to 1/2 full of water.
Place glass bowl or jar into water making sure no water gets into the jar.
Add beeswax, coconut oil, shea butter and essential oil til melted and mixed.
Stir in beetroot powder.
Use an eye dropper or small spoon to fill up empty unused lip balm tubes or tins.
Go back and top off to prevent the weird little hole from forming at the top of the lip balm if using tubes.

Making labels:
I only had return address labels at hand so I formatted a Word document to fit the labels. Fonts I used were Sadhira from dafont.com and Arial. The background photo I found through searching “Pink Lemonade” images with the Creative Commons tag on Word. The origin of the photo I used was http://dottydotdotdesign1.blogspot.com .

Next time around
I would probably grind up the beet root powder finer so there would not be so many flecks in the balm. I would also add Vitamin E oil to act as a preservative to ensure that the lip balm would last a little longer and for added moisturizing properties. Also, I would buy full sized sticker sheets or specifically lip balm labeling sheets to make more professional looking labels. Finally I would have made my own image but I was being lazy as these were not for sale.

Extra information
Why locally sourced beeswax?
Just a personal preference. I purchased from a small business that specializes in bee keeping supplies. By choosing locally source beeswax you are supporting your local economy and helping local bee colonies to thrive. A lot of the time these local bee colonies are relocated from residential areas to more rural areas where they will not hurt humans and can help pollinate local farms and keep those businesses thriving. I like to think this helps the bees by putting them closer to food sources instead of close to urban areas and smog.

Why choose organic, virgin, cold pressed, unrefined?
We are constantly bombarded with toxic chemicals and free radicals in and out of our homes. While organic is not pesticide free, it has significantly less pesticides that an average product. https://www.usda.gov/topics/organic

Information on Virgin oils https://www.organicfacts.net/health-benefits/oils/virgin-coconut-oil.html

Information on cold pressed oils http://www.livestrong.com/article/145529-what-is-cold-pressed-oil/

Refining oils requires the use of solvents such as hexane and workers who deal with hexane can be poisoned by exposure. https://www.epa.gov/sites/production/files/2016-09/documents/hexane.pdf

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